All-Story and Argosy were two of the Munsey magazines. These belonged to Frank A. Munsey (1854-1925), the man who invented the Pulp magazine format. He believed it was the story that was important, not the paper it was printed on. And he was right, because he became very rich doing this.

These magazines were originally known as “the soft magazines” at the turn-of-the-century, only becoming known as the Pulps after many competitors copied Munsey’s methods and filled the newstands with every kind of Pulp imaginable. Before the 1930s, most Pulps were non-genre specific. So in any weekly issue of All-Story (the magazine that promises no non-fiction in its very title) you would find an Edgar Rice Burroughs Tarzan novel next to a Rex Stout story before he created Nero Wolfe or a Zane Grey Western or a thriller by John Buchan or a Ray Cummings space adventure. You would also find Northerns like James B. Hendryx’s serialized novel The Gold Girl and Hulbert Footner’s The Furbringers. And there seem to be a lot of people getting attacked by bears here…


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